Blog

THE TIES BETWEEN A HOUSE BOY AND HIS EMPLOYER

This piece by Lu Wong, who reports from Vancouver for Sing Tao, appeared in Sing Tao Daily on September 18th, 2010. You can also download it as a PDF (3.2 Mb). This translation is by Shan (Joanna) Qiao. A tale of a man much like the one depicted in Hong Kong’s award-winning movie A Simple Life is happening here in Canada. Former Chair of The Writer’s Union of Canada Susan Crean started her trip to Taishan, China last year in search of the untold story of Wong Chong Wong, her family servant for 37 years. Susan went to...

IN SEARCH OF A HEAD TAX PAYER’S PAST

This article, by a staff writer, was originally published in Sing Tao September 18, 2010, and later reprinted in Kang He magazine. You can also download the article as a PDF (6.1Mb). The translation below is by Shan (Joanna) Qiao.Canadian writer of Irish descent Susan Crean is searching for the past of a long deceased family servant, the Head Tax payer Wong Dong Wong, a kind and influential member of her family who is still remembered . Born and raised in a middle class family in Toronto's Forest Hill, Susan studied and travelled in Europe and...

SPEAKING ABOUT EMILY CARR AT THE AGO

On June 6th I was part of a panel at the Art Gallery of Ontario brought together by curator and writer Sarah Milroy. It was also the week the Truth and Reconciliation Commission made its report. Here is what I had to say about Carr and her legacy. My thanks to Sarah Milroy for the invitation to be part of this gathering today. I would like to note that though I’ve spoken here at the AGO on several occasions — it was usually outside the front door and at a protest — this is the first time I have actually come...

What Really Happened to 12(1)(b)?

12(1)(b), the infamous clause in the Indian Act which stripped Native women of their status when they married non-Native men, was repealed in 1985. Like many, I assumed that ended of the story. We were all wrong !!  Here is what Ottawa served up in its place.  as explained to me by constitutional and human rights lawyer, Mary Eberts.  PLEASE SHARE.    “The legislation that removed 12(1)(b) is still known colloquially as Bill C-31, passed in 1985, to coincide with the coming into force of section l5 of the Charter, which guarantees equality. “Bill C-31 did several things. It...

MR. WONG’S STORY: A TALE OF SACRIFICE AND GENEROSITY

This article was originally published in The Toronto Star on January 26, 2011 as part of a special supplement celebrating the Chinese New Year. You can download a PDF version of the piece (78Kb). I was probably a couple of days old when I first met Wong Dong Wong. From then on he was part of my life, someone I was always in touch with and saw regularly until he died 25 years later. My earliest memories include him, and, throughout my childhood, he was a source of unending magic. Example: The drawer in the kitchen mysteriously...

LOOKING FOR WONG DONG WONG

This piece was published in Tai Shan magazine in November, 2010, a scan of which you can download as a PDF (2.3Mb). I am a Canadian writer of Scottish and Irish descent. Two years ago I began work on a book which will include the story of a Chinese Canadian, Wong Dong Wong, who was born in Taishan, and came to Canada as a boy of 16 in 1911. In 1917, he relocated from Vancouver on Canada's West coast to Toronto, and by the late 1920s when he met my grandfather he was working as a domestic cook....

VISITING THE WONGS’ ASSOCIATION

This article was originally published in the Wongs' Association Convention magazine in 2011. You can also download the article as a PDF (2.3Mb). Climbing the narrow staircase to the Wongs’ Association’s third floor office in downtown Toronto, past the plaque reading Wong Kung Har Wun Sun Association in Chinese and English, you reach a nondescript door that gives no hint of what lies beyond. When the association bought the building in 1979 the entire top floor was redesigned and the space opened up. Along with offices and a small kitchen, it now accommodates a large assembly hall with...

Scroll to top